Repeat. Repeat.

Day 30: Poem About a Reoccurrence

The last prompt of NaPoWriMo 2017 is write about something that happens over and over, in general or in your own life. The poem I wrote yesterday just so happens to fall into that category.

Seasoning

Leaves, snow, flowers, repeat.
Here it’s mild then heat, heat, heat.
Up north flee the cold.
Down here flee the sun.
Why can’t there be a place
where it’s fall forever?

Favorite Things

Day 29: Word from Favorite Poem

Today’s prompt is a bit complicated to explain in the title above. I’m supposed to take a concrete noun from one of my favorite poems, spend five minutes brainstorming words related to it and then create a poem from that. I’m taking mine from Longfellow’s “Loss and Gain.”

Current

The sea goes out,
The sea goes in,
when Moon’s allure
outweighs Earth’s spin.

The sea between
the reefs seems calm.
You swim through it
without a qualm.

The sea goes out,
The sea goes in,
when Moon’s allure
outweighs Earth’s spin.

You splash and play
and little see
the shore recede
so gradually.

The sea goes out,
The sea goes in,
when Moon’s allure
outweighs Earth’s spin.

You turn and look;
the shifting tide
has taken you
on quite a ride.

The sea goes out,
The sea goes in,
when Moon’s allure
outweighs Earth’s spin.

You swim towards shore,
but tread in place.
There’s no way you
can keep the pace.

The sea goes out,
The sea goes in,
when Moon’s allure
outweighs Earth’s spin.

A little voice
inside your head
tells you to swim
sideways instead.

The sea goes out,
The sea goes in,
when Moon’s allure
outweighs Earth’s spin.

Riptide’s cold grip
has set you free
Two feet on sand.
Goodbye to sea.

Skelton Key

Day 28: Skeltonic Verse

I regret to report that this poetic form has nothing to do with skeletons. Its name comes from John Skelton, a 15th century English poet. Also known as tumbling verse, this form features rhyming two-foot lines (dipodic) of irregular length, no consistent rhyme scheme and no stanza break.

Freak

See if you can
the two-mouthed man.
One mouth speak lies;
from one truth flies.
But few surmise
death in his eyes.

Sense It

Day 27: Taste Poem

Today’s prompt is to write a poem exploring your sense of taste. I combined taste and smell, since the two are closely linked. I wrote an intro stanza and then one for each kind of taste.

Tastebuds

If you close your eyes
you can taste the air
and know where you are.

The bitter, yet delicious,
pure crystalline cold
on your tongue before a snowstorm.

The salty grit
masking the fishy
undercurrent of the beach.

The buttery, floured
fresh savor of a kitchen
with freshly-baked bread.

The pursed-lip, cringing
sour flavor of
lemon trees.

Dig It

Day 26: Present-Day Archaeological Poem

This is my favorite prompt of the month: To write about a current-day object or place from the point of view of a future archaeologist. I’ve always wondered what future archaeologists would make of objects that seem normal to us (and what ancient cultures would think of our interpretation of them). I think I like the prompt more than the end result, though.

Cell

It’s a small rectangular object,
solid but not sharp.
One one side there are fingerprints
etched on part of its surface.
There are flecks of silver on each end,
perhaps a decorative element.

On the other side, a square protrusion
with a small circle embedded on it
appears to be made of glass.
Purpose unknown.

There are round and square holes
at its edges, which might enable it to be attached
to something else.

Spaced Out

Day 25: A Poem About a Space

I almost wrote “a poem about space” above and realized people would automatically assume I meant outer space. Today’s prompt is to write about a small, defined, meaningful space. I’m the exact opposite of claustrophobic and have always loved enclosed spaces (claustrophilaic?).  I must admit, I took issue with the first Harry Potter book’s negative take on a space I thought was so magical as a child.

A Room with a View

The room beneath the stairs
was a secret place
that smelled of cut wood and stardust,
where words hatched dreams
and make-believe worlds bloomed
in the dusky light.

Ars longa, vita brevis

Day 24: Ekphrasis

As the name implies, this poetic form dates back to ancient Greece and describes a work of art. Today’s prompt is write about marginalia of medieval manuscripts. They range from cute and quirky to violent and disturbing. Kind makes you wonder if future generations will write about all our idiotic doodles.

Shell vs. Shield

“You’re in a sticky mess”
said the snail to the knight.
“Dragons bring the heat,
but I’m still tough to fight.

Your club can crack my shell,
but slime can hold you fast.
Your shield wears a frown,
because you’ve lost at last.”